Mapping public transit in Bangalore

In February, I spent some time looking at BMTC data from openbangalore.org to understand the network better. This post first appeared on Mapbox. 

Buses are Bangalore’s most popular mode of transport. The Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC), one of the oldest transport organizations in India, operates over 2,000 routes with a fleet strength of about 6,500 buses. BMTC recorded a ridership of 5.02 million every day in September 2015, that’s on the order of daily subway ridership in New York City.

To understand this massive network better, we need open data. Public transit data in India are not available by default, but activist groups like Open Bangalore go out and create them. I spent some time last week analyzing the network, location of bus stops, timing and distribution.

Longest route

BMTC is known for its many long routes. Route 600 is the longest, making a roundtrip around the city, covering 117 km in about 5 hours. There are 5 trips a day, and these buses are packed throughout.

Frequency

Next, I wanted to look at the frequency of different routes. In the image below, stroke thickness indicates how many trips each route makes in a day. You can see north Bangalore has fewer, but more frequent routes, whereas the south has more routes with less frequency. You can also see the Outer Ring Road, which circles the entire city.

Reachability

I defined reachability as the destinations a passenger can get to from a given stop without changing busses. The BMTC network operates long but direct routes covering the entire city. The map shows straight lines between bus stops that are connected by a single route. The furthest you can get is from Krishnarajendra Market to the eastward town of Biskuru: roughly 49 km as the crow flies.

 

Direction

Which directions does BMTC run? It is interesting that BMTC covers the city North – South (blue) and East – West (brown) with almost equal distribution.

Coverage

BMTC routes are categorized into different series. Starting from 1 – 9 and A – W. I analyzed coverage based on series 2 (blue) and 3 (green) and they make up almost 76% of the entire network.

For this analysis, I used QGIS and Turf.js to inspect the route data. You can see some of the scripts on Github and the maps are all made using Mapbox Studio.