2.5 years.

I joined the Karnataka Learning Partnership in May 2012. We just launched version 11.0 of our web platform.

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a while now. Recently, it marked 2.5 years of my association with the Karnataka Learning Partnership. This is not my going away post and I’m not going away. I want to talk about how amazing the environment is for someone entirely new to the public education space. I want to talk about how extraordinary the team is. I want to talk about how different our processes are. And I want to talk about how patience, understanding and teamwork will go a long way.

If you haven’t heard about the Akshara Foundation or the Karnataka Learning Partnership, KLP is incubated at Akshara Foundation and they both work closely to improve schooling in Karnataka. KLP does great amounts of work on streamlining data collection processes, building dashboards and acting as an interface between several organisations in the education space in Karnataka and India.

When I joined KLP, it was a team of three – me, Megha Vishwanath, and Shivangi Desai, headed by the inimitable Gautam John. My role was largely around organising the wealth of spatial data that we just collected and collated from various sources. Wrangling dirty data and organising things makes me happy. KLP has a pretty strong software infrastructure history. Even though Python and PostgreSQL made it to the mix, there were other unmaintained open source software and a lot of unseen complexity in the code base. To be true to my open map heart, I rewrote the maps infrastructure. It was mostly a matter of throwing in couple of new end-points to the API and writing the front-end in JavaScript. Pretty basic. I wasn’t quite ready to dive into the madness of our existing API, so I made sure I touched little of the legacy code base. Couple of months down the line, I built a dashboard for showing SSLC performance. We worked on an array of projects right after – DISE dashboard, reports, status and a lot more. We were quite sure about an overhaul of our infrastructure and soon started talking about it. I was fairly open to the idea, but concerned, considering that there are only 3 of us and a rewrite is a lot of work.

Today, we are seven people, people I must mention because I owe them so much for understanding how diverse a team could be and accepting the fact that everybody is trying – Gautam John, Bibhas Debnath, Sanjay Bhangar, Vinayak Hegde, Brijesh Poojary, Deviprasad Adiga. Megha and Shivangi did much of the tough work of getting all the things in place for us to start. Everything we have built is based on what we have had. If there is a new feature, we have made sure that all of us thoroughly understand that it is required and how it should work. Our team is geographically disconnected – between Bombay, Calcutta, Pune and Bangalore. This is not the only thing we are doing. Each of us are involved in several other exciting projects and have weird schedules that barely overlap. To me, it is amazing to see how we have pulled this new platform in under five months. We have met twice in the process and rest of it happened over video conferences and telephone calls. I personally have had a very rough time over the last two months, which was when we were gearing up towards the crunch period. I was moved by the way the team managed to make sure that I was involved in a very limited capacity, but made sure that what needs to be done was taken care of.

To be honest, rewrites are hard. I try to avoid them as much as possible but when software becomes a liability, you have to make sure it works and continues to do so. Rewrites are usually a fairly intense process, because you are never starting from a clean slate. For the most part, you have a team which doesn’t quite understand most of how the legacy system works. Disconnect within the team is not uncommon, but it’s difficult. I have seen how the seven of us accommodated each of the ideas on the table. It’s about listening and understanding each other. It’s about respecting and realising that the other person is also committed to building the best product. It’s about being polite and being patient. And finally it’s about embracing the fact that there are only three certainties – life, death and fucked up data.

Update: We also work with some of the best technologists on and off, most recently Vamsee Kanakala and Rahul Gonsalves along with his team at Uncommon.

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